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for the worst. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making prarations today. erika ller repor. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars strande
. >> reporter: despite solid earnings at the end of last year, there are fresh worries about the state of the u.s. economy and profits for this year. on top of that, financial conditions in the eurozone are still a threat to u.s. stocks. >> with the market at current levels, which... basically looks like they're priced for perfection, there doesn't leave a lot of room for any disappointing news. and there are a lot of areas that could create disappointing news. >> reporter: weissberg says many market pros believe stocks are headed higher, but they need a catalyst, and that's unlikely to come from tonight's state of the union. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why ailing smartphone maker blackberry is hoping the sports market will help it on its road to recovery. we'll explain in tonight's "beyond the scoreboard." a "silly sideshow--" that's what apple c.e.o. tim cook called a recent lawsuit filed by hedge fund manager david einhorn. speaking at a goldman sachs technology conference today, cook also said apple is considering einhorn's proposal to issue preferred stock and r
agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. go online to pbskidsgo.org and you can take clips from the show make your own video, music video, or even a video about me, manny spamboni! now go, so i can watch it! (cackling) we've been walking for a half hour and we only got from the see slide to the... (laughter) you are not you're -- (laughter) nice! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening. i'm susie gharib. tom is off tonight. hungry for a deal, warren buffett partners up to buy up ketchup maker heinz in a $28 billion deal. the u.s. airways/american airlines merger is ready for take-off, and the companies say they see no turbulence ahead from washington regulators. and senate democrats offer their plan to head off the sequester's sharp spending cuts. we get the details from michigan senator debbie stabenow. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r." two big sweetheart deals on this valentine's day: american airlines is merging with u.s. airways, creating the world's largest airline company; and
erican greetings, proud sponsor of "the electric company." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. go online now to pbskidsgo.org and play some electric company games. you can win points forll of your favorite people, or your most favorite person, me, manny spamboni. now go, because the next time i see you, i better have more points. you're almost there! i need that cheese. you got it, you got it! come on, buddy, i need the cheese. and didn't we know how to a...da -- sorry. (laughter) ooh, i threw my neck out! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening. i'm susie gharib. hewlett-packard's turnaround gains traction, c.e.o. meg whitman in with a winning quarter and an improved outlook. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. from weakening demand, to currency concerns, we look at what's behind the big selloff in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight
the u.s. embassy in turkey's capital was an "act of terror," said a white house spokesman today. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the deadly blast from a reporter on the scene in ankara. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports on a widening divide between israelis and palestinians after more than a decade of starts and stops in pece talks. waer: thousas ofsraeli shoppers used to drive up this road to take advantage of the bargains in the palestinian shops just ahead. the popular shopping district has become a virtual ghost town. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newour has been proded by: >> bnsf railw
they can make in mexico and what they can do outside the u.s. >> reporter: anheuser-busch inbev offered to sell of it's interest inn importing arm nstlati bras anmake the company the sole importer of corona beer for ten years. but the justice department says that solution does not go far enough. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: on wall street today, stocks finished lower on mixed news about the economy, and worries about tomorrow's important jobs report. jobless claims rose by 38,000, more than expected. consumer spending rose slightly in december, as personal income climbed 2.6%, the highest increase in eight years, on this last trading day of january, the dow lost almost 50 points, the nasd was unchanged, and the s&p fell about four points. despite the sell off today, january was a strong month for stocks. the dow surged 6%, its best january since 1994. a 4% gain on the nasdaq, and the s&p jumped 5%. on wall street, they say a big january for stocks usually means a big year as well, it's called the "january barometer." if stocks follow history, they could be up by 20% or
over one day. another factor is there are rebels jihaddists, al-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't rul
>>> long road ahead. authorities in the u.s. investigate the dreamliner and find its batteries could keep it on the ground for sometime to come. u.s. transportation investigators cast doubt on a quick fix for the problems facing the dreamliner. they say regulators need to rethink their approval of batteries used in the boeing 787. a number of agencies are looking in to a string of safety incidents. deborah hershman chairs. she said a lithium ion battery sparked a fire a month ago on a japan airlines yet in boston. >> this investigation has demonstrated that a short circuit in a single cell can propagate to adjacent cells and result in smoke and fire. >> engineers packaged eight cells together in designing the battery system for the dreamliner. hersman said they did not place them far enough apart so trouble in one of them could affect the others. she said investigators have not determined why the batteries short circuited. another battery fire forced the pilot of a dreamline tore make an emergency last month in western japan. u.s. authorities grounded all 787s. officials at boe
." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. mmy, bat, nuggets and all your favorite animated characters are auditioning, and you're the judge. so plug into pbskidsgo.org and play to decide who has what it takes. wait, wait, jess, don't leave. i'll help you out here. pull! (glass breaking) cut! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. worries about political gridlock, in italy and in washington, cause investors to dump stocks. it's the worst day for wall street since the november elections. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. with $85 billion in federal spending cuts just days away, we talk with congresswoman cathy mcmorris rodgers. >> susie: and the man who founded barnes and noble wants to buy his bookstores back, but he has no interest in the company's electronic book reader b&n's nook business. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: a sharp sell off on wall street today, as stocks suffered their biggest drop since november. italian and american politics put investors in
angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo- haris, who offers a complex portrait of the woman best known for refusing to give up her seat on an alabama bus in 1955. >> she is celebrated for one act and i think part of that celebration puts it all in the past, right, when the actual rosa parks keeps working on racial and social justice issues all the way up t
numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today apple issued thi
companies, and investors are seeing in the u.s. economy. we preview the economic state of the union. why regulators need to treat them like other business. then u.s. airways sees big benefits in merging with american airlines. we look at the new landscape for airlines if the deal goes through. we have that anmore tonight on nbr. president obama is preparing to deliver his first state of the union address of his new term, tomorrow. the american people will be listening carefully to his plans to grow the economy, especially as they struggle with less take home pay, and worries about their jobs. while there are signs of improvement in the economy, the unemployment rate rose in january to 7.9%. so what is the current state of the economy? erika miller talked to two experts with different views. >> reporter: it may seem strange to many investors that the stock market can be hovering at five- year highs, when the economy is so weak. but what's fueling the rally is not the current situation, it's hope. >> we've taken out some of the downside tail risks. so, we're feeling like although it's not
>>> they want to snow why another crew locked onto a helicopter. japanese and u.s. officials are urging the chinese to ensure such accidents don't happen again. a chinese navy aimed at a helicopter in mid-january. japa controls the islands. china and taiwan claim them. >> translator: it's extremely regrettable that such a unilateral provocative action has been taken. we will strongly urge the chinese to exercise restraint and not make the situation any worse. >> a spokesperson said she learned about the incident through the media. japanese government officials say the chinese are trying to give the impression they're not behind the incidents. >>> the u.s. defense secretary says it could have had grave consequences. l leon panetta says it could inflame intentions. >> they have to be part of family of nations in that region working gether. >> panetta said the united states, south korea and japan will do everything possible to ensure their territories are secu secure. he called on china to avoid antagonizing other nations. the former secretary of state said u.s. officials oppose
, but not on saturdays. the u.s. postal service is dropping saturday letter deliveries to save billions. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. fresh pain at the pump. american drivers see a steep jump in gas prices: up 15 cents a gallon in the past week alone. >> susie: and the federal reserve says it's been hit, by cyber hackers. we look at u.s. businesses and just how safe their networks are. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. postal service says this summer it will stop delivering mail on saturdays, ending a service that began 150 years ago. cutting back to a five-day a week schedule will save $2- billion. the post office has been losing about $20 million a day, as e- mail useage ramps up and mail volume plunges. congress has required the post office to deliver six days a week, but the postmaster general believes there is a loophole in the law that will allow him to make the change. darren gersh reports on the business fallout. >> reporter: first class mail is the postal service's most profitable product. it is also a business that is disappearing at the rate of 5% a year. >> people pay
. >> and -- >> there is not a country in the world that believes that the u.s. drone attacks that we are doing on countries that we are not at war with is the right and sustainable solution for us. >> all we have is the president interpreting his own powers and the limits on his own powers. and that is not the way it's supposed to work. we need more oversight. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, d committed to dog real andermane good thworld. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, rdant, and peafuworld. re information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh
american greetings, proud sponsor of "the electric company." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. just go online to pbskidsgo.org. we have behind-the-scenes, entire episodes, and loads of brand-new games all the time. but n't just take my wd for it, go, check it out for yourself. play your harmonica like you mean it! this is going to go on a long time! and i'm not sorry to do it! i love that thing! i like your hat! i like your shoes! (laughter) captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. from less money in your paycheck, to paying more at the gas pump, consumers are feeling the pinch, now company's dependent on spending, are feeling the heat. then there's coming government spending cuts. does the economy have enough kick in it to withstand the sequester? and a big win for activist investor david einhorn in his fight to get apple to share the wealth, with its shareholders. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! if you get a paycheck, no doubt you have see
says iran will be at the top of his agenda when u.s. president barack obama visits israel next month. >>> chinese officials have tak over management of a port in pakistan. officials from a chinese state run firm acquired the rights last month to control gwadar port in south western pakistan. it lies near the strait of hormuz. pakistani president and chinese ambassador attended a hand over ceremony in the capital. the port is strategic for chichn it imports crude oil from the north. >> it gives importance to china-pakistan relations. >> the chinese ambassador says much of china remains unstable. they must take advantage when they see openings. >> to seize opportunities. >> chise companies were recent involved in a series of port projects in myanmar. the entrance into pakistan has raised concerns in india. >>> people in many parts of china say the clouds of smog they have seen for weeks make it harder to breathe. scientists say particles in the air could damage people's health. researchers studied samples from the atmosphere over beijing and two other areas. they detected a harmful com
concerns at the u.s.-japan summit; a public health crisis linked to gun violence; shields and brooks and violence against women in south africa. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a winter storm headed east today, after socking the plains with snow, sleet and freezing rain. it was already blamed for four deaths, flight disruptions and hundreds of road accidents. the huge system was moving north and east, and losing some of its punch. but it was still expected to make trouble in the northeast and new england this weekend. the sounds of snowblowers roaring to life and shovels scraping the driveway could be heard in state after state today. much of the nation's mid-section spent the day digging out from more than a foot of snow and for drivers, it quickly turned into an icy nightmare. the highly unsettled storm also brought lightning and thunder, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal with. >> it fell fast, it fell heavy
. >> reporter: stuck in neutral. that seems to be the best cliche for the u.s. job market, right now. the nation's unemployment rate has been lurking just around 8% for the last six months. and, the number of news jobs created is barely keeping pace with population growth. still, some economists think the latest labor data is encouraging. >> when we look at the number of jobs being created even though it was a tad below expectations, it was still a healthy number that should continue to help the economy. >> reporter: the main reason for optimism: those positive revisions to november and december jobs data. it turns out, the government underestimated how many positions were added by 127,000. it was that miscounthat helped push the dow over 14,000 for the first time in more than five years. and, at 14,000 the blue-chip index is about 150 to 200 points away from its all-time high. market pros like wayne kaufman predict new highs for stocks in coming weeks. >> many investors, retail investors, individual investors are reaching the point of recognition where they no longer believe the economy is goin
." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to lea grant, and viewers like y, thank yo visit pbskidsgo.org where you can play a lot of games for your favorite characters and win votes, too. go ahead, what are you waiting for? hey, you... cut it! (laughing) that's awkward. (laughter) put your -- put it -- sorry! put your name on your mind and... (laughter) captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. wall street's rally extends to a second day, erasing much of the week's losses and pushing the dow to a five year high. helping the markets higher were more commitments by the federal reserve to keep doing what its doing, until the economy improves. but a sour day for apple shareholders, as c.e.o. tim cook sheds little light on how the company plans to use its hoard of cash. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! for the second day in a row, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke told congress the central bank is not about to change its strategy, and for a second day, a strong rally on wall street. the dow surged 175 points
and the technology industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is going to try to capture those markets. >> they want to continue to be a hardware player, but
abuse by priests. also, this week, the president of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops, cardinal timothy dolan of new york was formally questioned by lawyers for sex abuse victims. the deposition centered on dolan's handling of abuse while he oversaw the milwaukee archdiocese. >>> as president obama this week urged congress to prevent massive federal spending cuts from going into effect march 1st, many religious groups argued the so-called sequester would disproportionately impact low-income americans. although social security, medicare and some anti-poverty programs are protected, the groups pointed to likely cuts in programs that provide food and other assistance. they called those cuts unconscionable and immoral. >>> human rights and religious freedom advocates are ramping up pressure on iran to release an iranian-born american christian pastor who was recently sentenced to eight years in prison there. saeed abedini was convicted last month of threatening iran's national security by helping to expand the house church movement. 80 members of the u.s. congress wrote to secretary
department's view that it is legal for the government to kill u.s. citizens overseas if it believes they pose an "imminent threat," even if there is no evidence of an immediate specific attack. some ethicists say that amounts to illegal targeted killings. >> they are not the best strategy, they are not ethically right, and they are not morally right. >>> after much campaigning by outside groups obothides, t boy scouts postponed until may a decision on lifting its ban on gay scouts and leaders. several conservative religious organizations were particularly vocal in their opposition to lifting the ban. there was also some religious support for changing the policy. about 70% of boy scout troops are sponsored by religious groups, the largest of which are mormons, followed by united methodists and catholics. >>> as faith groups continue to push for comprehensive immigratn rerm, some are now raising concerns over president obama's support for same-sex couples in his plan. the president wants to give same-sex couples the same rights as heterosexual couples, including the right to sponsor a partner f
broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about h positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world. >> i believe, and always have, that america must engage, not retreat, in the world, but engage in the world. my record is consistent on these points. >> woodruff: but as a nebraska senator, in 2007, hagel angered fellow republicans when he opposed the surge of u.s. troops into iraq
of the market-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agen and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> rorter: s&p pointout cou rulings he diissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us with some consumer product stoc
from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. i'm sorry, there's something on your nose. it's a white...thing. he's my brother and he's no liar, so back off, francine. great...cut! (laughter) i know you like playing games, and i always try to do my best. so go to pbskidsgo.org and play awesome electric company games and earn points r your favorite person, like me, hector. i mean, i'm your favorite, right? so what are you waiting for? >> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. federal reserve boss ben bernanke shows signs that the central bank will continue buying government bonds to help support the economy. the housing recovery continues building ground, with new home sales and home prices hitting multi-year highs. and the banking business may have fewer employees, but wall street bonuses are up, rising nearly 10% on average. tonight, a closer look at banking jobs. that and more tonight on nbr! the federal reserve strategy of buying government bonds to help the economy will continue.
on the monster storm from bernie rayno of accuweather. >> woodruff: then, should the u.s. arm the rebels in syria? ray suarez examines a growing rift between the white house and key members of the president's cabinet. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of new discoveries about mars coming from the rover vehicle known as "curiosity," the product of nasa's jet propulsion lab. >> it may sound familiar but what scientists here at jpl are actually looking for are signs of life past and present on the red planet >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with pulitzer- prize-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation cre
, the state of play in florida, which has some of the least restrictive gun laws in the u.s. >> nothing really truly equalizes a smal petite woman with someone who's 6'3, 230 pounds who's angry except a firearm. >> those weapons often times fall in the hands of bad folks in our communities. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan brings together high school students from across the country to talk about guns and violence. >> woodruff: and as oscar night nears, tony scott, movie critic for the "new york times," gives us his take on the latest buzz about wild cards and front runners. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fro
ctric company." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. have you checked out "the electric company" online? go to pbskidsgo.org -- check out the games, clips, and tons more. the best part is, there's new stuff added all the time. you don't believe me? go check it out for yourself. (laughter) she stole my special skill! give it back this instant! ok, no! never! (beeping) get away, get away from me. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening i'm tom hudson. stocks fall on fresh signs that even the federal reserve isn't sure how much is enough, when it comes to boosting the economy, by buying government bonds. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. can two weaklings become strong by teaming up. that's what office depot and office max are hoping for, as they decide to merge. >> tom: and a mixed picture on housing, contractors break ground on more single family homes, but pull back on building apartments and condos. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! how much longer should the federal reserve continu
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and atchoishey pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i s
'm ready, coach, i'm locked in, i'm dedicated, committed for th next two years th team u.s.a. with you and whatever you need prefrom me i'm ready to do it. >> rose: here's what he said about you. roll tape. >> holy mackerel, carmelo, you're doing an interview with charlie rose. man, he's come a long way since learning how to play contesting defense for the u.s. team. but charlie, one of the great things, the things that makes carmelo such a fantastic basketball player is he's a war your, you know? he's as good a competitor as i coached in the seven years i've coached the u.s. national team. i love my relationship with him. he's multiing dimensional. he can play the three, four, or five for us. and he's a problem for anybody at all on these positions offensively. the cool thing and the great thing is he's strong enough, determined enough and smart enough to defend all three of those positions. the truly one of the great players in our game today. >> that's big coming from him. (laughs) >> rose: didn't get much bigger than that, does it? this is auy whs won t admiration of you and kobe a
that the people who put food on our tables use food stamps at twice the rate as the rest of the u.s. workforce. meaning that the people who put food on our tables can't afford to put food on their own family's tables. >> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new yor celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and commied to doinreal and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful wor. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and
. the city on the other hand as a whole is, as a u.s. census bureau noted briefly, that we're growing faster than any other city in america. now forbes is says we're one of the best places to do business. and there's a lot of great stuff going on. but it going to take us time to rebuild the entire city. will you have the same exact experience in the northeast as you try to rebuild the rockaways and will you see some neighborhoods that come back faster than others and frustrations with fema getting money to the ground. the essential component is for people not to build it back like it was. to really think about what it should have always been. so for example, in concrete terms, if a school building got destroyed, instead of putting that building back and painting it like it was, build a new 21st century school. build a sustainable school, build a school system that is going to teach to knowledge-based economy. that is what we have done in new orleans because we realize that the foundations that were in place were taking us someplace where we didn't want to go. and that's why we had to reconst
, michigan, my parents are not u.s. citizens. they ever's students, they're, they were here to do their medical training. they met in ann arbor and because of the first sentence of the 14th endment, great gift, the constitution gives a gift to peon my birthday, a birthday gift t makes me a citizen of the united states. >> because is with born here, no questions asked. and i think ever since, and i grew up as an immigrant kid, very much believing in america. my parents chose this place. they came here and i have been, i have this love affair with mark and its constitution and we have been trying ever since to repay the gift that it gave me. >> rose: when did you decide you wanted to be a cotitutionalcholar? >> thi in retrospect, you know, things seem obvious. but i think it was a process. i think there were three things that were key. when i was 10 years old my parents took me to see independence hall and the declaration of independence where it was drafted and the constitution. we went to the national archives. we went, hi lunch with my congressperson. and i visited mount vernon a
decision on whether to send u.s. troops into pakistan. >> he also knew that if it had gone wrong, there would not only have been dramatically negative consequences for the men he sent in, and for our country's security, but also for his own politics. it very ll could he been a reerndindecion. >> narrator: the president decided to authorize the operation for sunday, may 1. >> i think that was one of the longest days that he's had as president. he said to us at the time that the minutes were feeling like hours, as we waited for the operation to begin. >> narrator: they waited for the signal that bin laden was in the compound. >> admiral mcraven provided the call sign "geronimo kia"-- "killed in action." and at that point, people kind of started to make eye contact and there was this sense of not just relief, but great pride and admiration in what had taken place. and nobody spoke until the president said to everybody around him, "looks like we got him." >> the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al qaeda. >> narrator: the killing of o
and the u.s. attorney community did? i think you have to take a step back. over the last couple of years, we have convicted raj rajaratnam. you'll say that's an insider trading case. but it's clearly going after wall street. >> smith: but it has nothing to do with the financial crisis, the meltdown, the packaging of bad mortgages that led to the collapse that led to the recession. >> well, first of all, i think that the financial crisis, martin, is multifaceted. and what we've had is a multipronged, multifaceted spon. and it's simply a fiction to say that where crimes were committed, we didn't pursue the cases. and that's why where crimes were committed, you have more people in jail today for securities fraud, bank fraud and the like than ever before. >> smith: but no wall street executives? >> no wall street executives. >> narrator: by september 2010, senator kaufman's term was nearing its end. before leaving, he held a second oversight hearing. >> criminals on wall street must be held to account. >> ted dided he wanted to have a second hearing before he left office so that he could questio
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